Top Texas Lawmaker Reaffirms Support For Medical Marijuana And Decriminalization At Youth GOP Event – Marijuana Moment

New Mexico House lawmakers approved a revised marijuana legalization bill on Wednesday, sending the proposal to the Senate, where lawmakers are scheduled to consider it later in the day.

HB 2 was approved on the House floor on a 38–32 vote shortly after noon. Earlier in the day, the full Senate voted 23–13 to passed accompanying legislation, SB 2, that would automatically expunge most low-level cannabis crimes.

Provisions in the two bills were originally part of a single piece of legislation, HB 12, that passed the House during the regular session but stalled on the Senate floor. Going into the special session, backers spun off the criminal justice matters in an effort to win support from Republicans and moderate Democrats who complained the proposal as a whole was too broad.

An afternoon hearing by the Senate’s Committee of the Whole will consider HB 2 alongside a competing legalization proposal, SB 3, from Sen. Cliff Pirtle (R), who began circulating draft legislation last week. The Republican lawmaker’s bill takes a simpler approach to legalization than HB 2, with lower taxes, no social equity provisions and a larger portion of tax revenue going to local governments.

Both bills would allow adults to grow cannabis at home, and neither would allow local governments to ban cannabis businesses.

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham called this week’s special session primarily to push legalization across the finish line.

If the remaining steps on the bills go smoothly, they could be sent to the governor for her signature by the end of the week. If HB 2 becomes law, legal sales would be scheduled to begin in new Mexico by April 1, 2022.

Here are some of the main provisions in the new legalization bill, HB 2,  as amended:

— Adults 21 and older could purchase and possess up to two ounces of cannabis, 16 grams of cannabis concentrates and 800 milligrams of infused edibles. All products would be tested by licensed laboratories for contamination and potency.

— Home cultivation of up to six mature cannabis plants would be allowed for personal use, provided the plants are out of public sight and secured from children. Households would be limited to 12 total plants. Marijuana grown at home could not be sold or bartered.

— Legal retail sales wouldn’t begin for another year or so, with a target date of April 1, 2022 or earlier. Final license rules would be due from the state by January 1, 2022, with licenses themselves issued no later than April 1.

— Advertising cannabis to people under 21 would be prohibited, with the use of cartoon characters or other imagery likely to appeal to children forbidden. Advertisements would also be barred from billboards or other public media within 300 feet of a school, daycare center or church. All products would need to carry a state-approved warning label.

— There is no limit on the number of business licensees that could be granted under the program, or the number of facilities a licensee could open, although regulators could stop issuing new licenses if an advisory committee determines that “market equilibrium is deficient.”

— Small cannabis microbusinesses, which could grow up to 200 plants, would be able to grow, process and sell cannabis products all under a single license. The bill’s backers have said the separate license type will allow wider access to the new industry for entrepreneurs without access to significant capital.

— Cannabis purchases will include a 12 percent excise tax on top of the state’s regular 8 percent sales tax. Beginning in 2025, the excise rate would climb by 1 percent each year until it reached 18 percent in 2030. Medical marijuana products, available only to patients and caretakers, would be exempt from the tax.

— In an effort to ensure medical patients can still access medicine after the adult-use market opens, the bill allows the state to force licensed cannabis producers to reserve up to 10 percent of their products for patients in the event of a shortage or grow more plants to be used in medical products.

— Local governments could not ban cannabis businesses entirely, as some other states have allowed. Municipalities could, however, use their local zoning authority to limit the number of retailers or their distance from schools, daycares or other cannabis businesses.

— Tribal governments could participate in the state’s legal cannabis industry under legal agreements contemplated under the bill.

— With certain social justice provisions expected to be repackaged into a separate bill, the legalization measure retains only some of HB 12’s original equity language, primarily focused on enacting procedures meant to encourage communities that have been disproportionately impacted by the war on drugs to participate in the new industry.

— The new industry would be overseen by a newly created Cannabis Control Division, part of the state Regulation and Licensing Department. Medical marijuana would also be regulated by that division, although the Department of Health would control the patient registry.

— By September of this year, the state would establish a cannabis regulatory advisory committee to advise the Cannabis Control Division. The committee would need to include various experts and stakeholders, such as the chief public defender, local law enforcement, a cannabis policy advocate, an organized labor representative, a medical cannabis patient, a tribal nation or pueblo, various scientists, an expert in cannabis regulation, an environmental expert, a water expert and a cannabis industry professional, among others.

— The bill as amended now includes language that would allow medical marijuana patients who are registered in other states to participates in in other states to access, a proposal that failed to pass during the regular session.

A separate spending bill introduced for the special session, HB 1, includes funding to establish and oversee New Mexico’s legal cannabis industry in the state. That measure has passed the Senate and awaits House consideration. Another measure, HB 4, would tighten laws on cannabis and driving by establishing a per se THC blood limit for DUIs, as some other states have put in place. That measure is scheduled for a hearing Wednesday afternoon in the House Rules and Order of Business Committee.

None of the bills was published online until more than an hour after the special session officially began on Tuesday.

Lawmakers spent hours on the House floor Wednesday rehashing many of the same issues that have been discussed for years around legalization. Advocates stressed that the change would ensure product testing and safety, set limits to discourage youth use of cannabis and bring millions of dollars in tax revenue to the state government.

Opponents, meanwhile, warned that legalization could increase more youth to consume cannabis and lead to an uptick in impaired drivers on New Mexico’s roadways. The bill’s supporters countered that many of those risks would be better addressed through legalization than criminalization, because products would be tested, sales would be limited to adults only and law enforcement would be trained to better recognize impairment and impaired driving.

“Cannabis is already here,” Martínez said. “If this bill becomes the law of the land…we can ensure that we develop the mechanisms that prevent [youth] access to cannabis.” He noted that he himself is a father of two kids, saying, “I don’t want my children to consume any type of substance that will be harmful for them.”

Martínez also drew attention to an October poll indicating that a strong majority of New Mexico voters are ready for the policy change. Some Republicans, however, said the poll results didn’t represent their districts.

Rep. Stefani Lord (R) drew attention to worries that people who use cannabis would not be allowed to own a gun. In addition to cannabis still being illegal at the federal level, a state law currently bars people from “carrying a gun while under the influence of an intoxicant or narcotic.”

“You have to make a decision,” Lord said: “Am I going to smoke pot, or am I going to lose my Second Amendment rights?”

The House adopted a pair of amendments to HR 2 before ending debate, one that would add a municipal police chief to the state’s cannabis advisory committee, and another that would require government reports to study the law’s impact.

Another floor amendment, brought by Rep. Bill Rehm (R), would have established a $100-per-ounce fine for possessing products not obtained in compliance with adult-use or medical marijuana laws, but the House tabled that proposal, effectively rejecting it.

Rehm attempted and failed to add the same amendment just hours earlier, at the late-night hearing of the House Judiciary Committee.

Another amendment offered by Rehm was also tabled by the Democrat-controlled House. That amendment would have made it a felony to intentionally distribute cannabis to minors.

The expungements bill, SB 2, passed the full Senate on Wednesday and next goes to the House of Representatives. The measure saw several relatively minor amendments in the body’s Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, most of which were technical changes to language that critics called unclear or unnecessary.

The measure would automatically erase past records of arrests or convictions for activity that would no longer be outlawed under legalization. People currently in custody for cannabis crimes would also be eligible for resentencing under the bill.

Among the more significant changes adopted in committee were a provision allowing people to petition for expungement anonymously, intended to avoid publicizing the charges being expunged. Another amendment adds human trafficking to a list of offenses that could allow state agencies to disqualify applicants for public employment or licensing.

Legislative leaders worked to hammer out a legalization deal throughout the state’s 60-day legislative session this year. Sponsors of at least five different original bills have tried to unify the conflicting proposals and incorporate feedback from colleagues. Going into the special session, HB 2’s sponsors have been working closely with the governor’s office to craft a final bill.

House Republicans have repeatedly blasted the process for not being more transparent, while others have criticized the special session as unnecessary.

“The past sixty days have been defined by the Governor and Democrats silencing the voice of the people, and the silence has become deafening following the crash and burn of their pot bill” during the regular session, House Republican Leader Jim Townsend said in a statement Monday. “If legalizing marijuana is truly about the people, you would think that New Mexicans from all walks of life would have the opportunity to contribute to the process, especially when it failed so miserable at the last minute due to too many cooks in the kitchen.”

Gov. Lujan Grisham, meanwhile, included cannabis legalization as part of her 2021 legislative agenda and has repeatedly talked about the need to legalize as a means to boost the economy, especially amid the coronavirus pandemic. She said during a State of the State address in January that “a crisis like the one we’ve experienced last year can be viewed as a loss or as an invitation to rethink the status quo—to be ambitious and creative and bold.”

Additional pressure to end cannabis prohibition this year is coming from neighboring Arizona, where sales officially launched in January after voters approved a legalization ballot initiative last year. To New Mexico’s north is Colorado, one of the first states to legalize for adult use.

Cannabis is also expected to be legalized across the southern border in Mexico, with lawmakers facing a Supreme Court mandate to end prohibition by the end of April.

Before last year’s failed effort, New Mexico’s House in 2019 approved a legalization bill that included provisions to put marijuana sales mostly in state-run stores, but that measure died in the Senate. Later that year, Lujan Grisham created a working group to study cannabis legalization and issue recommendations.

In May of last year, the governor signaled she was considering actively campaigning against lawmakers who blocked her legalization bill in 2020. She also said that she’s open to letting voters decide on the policy change via a ballot referendum if lawmakers can’t send a legalization bill to her desk.

New York Governor Signs Marijuana Legalization Bill, Hours After Lawmakers Put It On His Desk

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Source: https://www.marijuanamoment.net/top-texas-lawmaker-reaffirms-support-for-medical-marijuana-and-decriminalization-at-youth-gop-event/


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